Thursday, May 25, 2006

What A Week Of War Cost Us?

I was watching Mark McDonald's Illinois Stories on WSEC recently. I usually watch it when I notice it's on, but I never really plan on watching it. Still it's a good program, and the local focus makes it well worth watching.

I believe it was two weeks ago there was an edition of Illinois Stories on, and I must admit that I was only partially paying attention to Mark's interview of a librarian of a small town library. The small town was very fortunate as virtually no new libraries are being built in the State of Illinois due to budget problems. This library was built with a one million dollar donation from a well to do family - I believe some rich farmer left it to the city in their will.


It was a nice little state of the art library. Any small town would be proud to have a beautiful little library like that.

I kept wondering why our nation can spend money on Iraq, but we are too poor to build libraries for our own towns?

Isn't it time to win some hearts, and minds right here at home?

One week of funding the war in Iraq would build 1500 "million dollar" libraries!

Sunday, May 21, 2006

El Presidente Puts End To Traitorous Reporters!


Photo: El Presidente

Viva El Presidente!
Viva El Presidente!
Viva El Presidente!

In a most brilliant move El Presidente has decided, as he is the decider!

Viva El Presidente!
Viva El Presidente!
Viva El Presidente!

In our glorious battle against the evil doers we must now shift our attention to elements within the Press who have chosen to align themselves with the terrorist!

That's right, they support the evil doing terrorist! These dark elements within the Press by their revelation of state secrets, and the deliberate telling of lies have endangered all of our lives - including the lives of our little children! Think of the little children! El Presidente has!


Viva El Presidente!

Viva El Presidente!
Viva El Presidente!


All along El Presidente has warned that you are either with us, or you are with the evil doers. El Presidente has been exceedingly patient, but that time has come to an end. No great leader like El Presidente could be expected to wait forever as traitorous reporters lie, and reveal state secrets! State secrets which once revealed endanger the very lives of our elderly parents, and grandparents! Think of our beloved elders! El Presidente has!

Viva El Presidente!
Viva El Presidente!
Viva El Presidente!



Photo: Generalisimo Alberto Gonzalez

El Presidente has ordered Generalisimo Gonzalez to be begin prosecution of all traitors, and scoundrels choosing to report lies about El Presidente! We shall imprison all those traitorous reporters who by their very words have chosen to support the evil doers by revealing state secrets! State secrets, and lies which once uttered endanger the lives of your most beloved. Think of your beloved family! El Presidente has!

Viva El Presidente!
Viva El Presidente!
Viva El Presidente!


A dark cell awaits all those who insist on questioning the kindness, and goodness of El Presidente! No longer will freedom of press be a tool of the traitor! By order of El Presidente this shall end now!

Viva El Presidente!
Viva El Presidente!
Viva El Presidente!


Image: Beware Traitorous Scum!

Read this and tremble you traitorous lot! We will be listening to every word you utter! We will be reading your every keystroke! We will know of every step you take. Your days are over!


WASHINGTON (AP) -- Attorney General Alberto Gonzales sa id Sunday he believes journalists can be prosecuted for publishing classified information, citing an obligation to national security.

The nation's top law enforcer also said the government will not hesitate to track telephone calls made by reporters as part of a criminal leak investigation, but officials would not do so routinely and randomly.

"There are some statutes on the book which, if you read the language carefully, would seem to indicate that that is a possibility," Gonzales said, referring to prosecutions. "We have an obligation to enforce those laws. We have an obligation to ensure that our national security is protected."

In recent months, journalists have been called into court to testify as part of investigations into leaks, including the unauthorized disclosure of a CIA operative's name as well as the National Security Agency's warrantless eavesdropping program.

Lucy Dalglish, executive director of the Reporters Committee for Freedom of the Press, said she presumed that Gonzales was referring to the 1917 Espionage Act, which she said has never been interpreted to prosecute journalists who were providing information to the public.

"I can't imagine a bigger chill on free speech and the public's right to know what it's government is up to -- both hallmarks of a democracy - than prosecuting reporters," Dalglish said.

Gonzales said he would not comment specifically on whether The New York Times should be prosecuted for disclosing the NSA program last year based on classified information.

He also denied that authorities would randomly check journalists' records on domestic-to-domestic phone calls in an effort to find journalists' confidential sources.

"We don't engage in domestic-to-domestic surveillance without a court order," Gonzales said, under a "probable cause" legal standard.

But he added that the First Amendment right of a free press should not be absolute when it comes to national security. If the government's probe into the NSA leak turns up criminal activity, prosecutors have an "obligation to enforce the law."

"It can't be the case that that right trumps over the right that Americans would like to see, the ability of the federal government to go after criminal activity," Gonzales said on ABC's "This Week."


Photos: Most likely under copyright, but not by me. I use them here under free use for literary purposes only. All images were modified by me for use in this posting. Do not use the images for commercial purposes without first obtaining permission of the copyright holder.

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